Advantages

Disadvantages

Archetype Explanation

Spellatael, briefly known as Stammeltael, alongside the Mulligan archetype terrorized Gwent players for the first week of a new patch. With an almost infinite barrage of spells kindly provided by Sage and ridiculous amounts of carryover, courtesy of Stammelford’s Tremors, few decks were able to stop Eithne’s unrelenting march against the d’hoine.

The introduction of Sages gave the Spell Control lists a proactive play which they so sorely needed, allowing them to generate tempo whilst creating carryover and denying opponent’s key pieces with Alzur’s Thunders - all at the same time. In its first iteration, the deck had ridiculous amounts of power, dictating the match, round by round, until its bitter end.

Thankfully, the hotfix defanged the Dryad Queen, removing their carryover and ability to infinitely copy spells with trusty Sages. Nonetheless, the archetype still has some life left in it, and in the meta where everyone seemingly forgot about the deck’s existence overnight, it might just be a sleeper hit that can catch the opponent off guard.


Sample Decklists:

Gravez Spellatael

The Gwentlemen contributor Gravez puts a different spin on the Swim’s Spellatael, trying to breathe in a new life into a crippled archetype. This list omits Stammelford’s Tremors, as it no longer provides its most valuable utility - carryover. Instead, it focuses on control tools such as Artefact Compression which can completely deny the opponent’s card, while Impenetrable Fog and Ragh Nar Roog will force the opponent out of the round, giving a control deck a gift which they yearn for so much - a complete control on the remainder of the game.